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We are not OK and that’s OK

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Dylan the dog coping with the chaos

Whilst over Christmas we might have looked like lucky buggers with enough time and money to be swanning off to Australia, in truth it was more like “pinch from Richard’s pension to have a holiday of a lifetime because we don’t know what scary news 2018 will bring with his brain scan looming”.

We hadn’t had a holiday for many years and we’d never had a big holiday. And we’d only ever had one family holiday with all five of us – which Tess was far too young to remember.

Richard had almost stopped surfing and we were both suffering from anxiety. The shop takings were down, the books weren’t balancing and we’d borrowed money three times to see us through winter and for much needed home improvements. We’d both also had 10 years of various physical and mental health wranglings to deal with on top of losing both our fathers.

Rich doesn’t like talking about this stuff. He grins and tells everyone he’s fine even when he’s absolutely not. He internalises money worries until he’s ill. So I joined him in the stoic front while privately I was in turmoil about his health and our future.

Grin and bear it is not my style though and I found it difficult to pretend – particularly as I had done months of research and knew the various reasons for tremors, and had contemplated the possible outcomes and the effects on not just his but all our lives.

While we were away thoughts of what we would be returning home to prevailed, and on the flight home I watched Richard’s tremor increase with the tiredness and anxiety, and wished I could stop it. I wished I could turn off his brain and give him a break.

When we returned from Australia in early January we had to gear ourselves up for hospital appointments and test results with months of winter still left to plough through. Surely it was finally time to stop pretending we were okay?

I eventually broke my silence and told Richard to prepare himself for a positive Parkinson’s diagnosis. I was worried that he had been hanging on too long to his former GP’s opinion that it was “just a tremor” and to the story he was telling himself and others that the scan was just to “rule out” Parkinson’s. I could see him coasting into yet another year of stress and full-time shop-running shenanigans without giving himself time to process the enormity of his own health issues. We are complete opposites when it comes to denial or self awareness and discussions of such, and I could foresee life getting very difficult with this “just keep plodding on” mentality of his.

It was time to dig deep and lay it all out.

So for seven months I have pushed to put what is important to the fore. I have made all our actions and visions and plans about family life and simple life; about peace, about reducing stress, about visualising what is best for all of us and making it happen. I am trying to force us both to recognise and accept – and love – each other’s quirks and limitations and work around them to make them no longer limitations.

Money, school grades, possessions, appearances, status, other people’s ideas about a life well lived are all off our radars. Bugger all that. We’ve bought a small unassuming house in order to pay off our mortgage, and don’t give a flying fig what people think of us.

Life is now going to be about acceptance, day-to-day appreciation, little stuff, beauty in nature, eating well, and space. Space in our heads, space in our timetables, space away from duty and phone calls, space away from the rat race. We have split open everything we ever were on the surface and are being the real us that we always were anyway – before we stopped lying.

And I do believe silence is a lie.

Other people use lies to survive, I get that. People need to ignore the truth in order to cope. Some people’s very existence depends on being as unaware of their true selves as possible.  But we’re using the truth to live by. The painful truth and the honest truth and the comfortable truth.

The hurdles to getting to that truth are huge though. We have a list as long as our arms of things we need to achieve and throw off, to finalise and to tolerate for a while, and we’re only down to our elbows so far.

We are exhausted. Richard’s tremor is awful. I feel sick regularly. I run out of peopling energy regularly. We are absolutely pig sick of eating out, of microwaving, of being uncomfortable. I don’t usually eat bread but I have had to for the last few months and I have a constant bread belly pain. We don’t sleep well at night, we get up early each day in case the builders/plumbers/electricians are here. We are unnerved by the inconsistency of life on a building site and of never knowing when noises will stop and start or if today the builders will come or they won’t come, of who wants to discuss what and what we have to answer. The days of nothing are as bad as the noisy days because the uncertainty is traumatic.

The concrete dust and insulation dust are bad for Richard’s asthma, and the decision-making and constant change is bad for his tremor.

I have had to try to forget I have an Asperger’s diagnosis and chronic anxiety. Noises, smells, newness, being surrounded by people, disruption are all excruciating and I am holding on to my big internal Mamma who is telling me I can cope and I will cope and I can collapse when this is all over. Internalising isn’t great though. It gives me mystery pains and nausea. I want to explain to everyone that anxiety is the most inexplicably exhausting thing to deal with and that I can’t live normally. I have periods of insomnia, periods of sleepiness and periods of illness. I can’t say that. Instead I rock up in the space we will one day call our home and sway weirdly from exhaustion, talk less than I should, indulge in fewer social niceties than I should and struggle massively to answer questions amidst the chaos and the noise and the dust. Loud noises make me freeze until they have passed. I can feel myself underperforming and it’s absolutely bloody horrid. I can barely function. And yet I do. Simple things like having a shower and drying my hair before the electricity is turned off this morning and trying to dish out dinner from the slow cooker on a desk in the hall last night are no longer feeling like an adventure but a nightmare.

The list is being ticked off though. And that’s why I’m writing this. We need a reminder of just what we’ve done, what we’ve gone through, what we’ve achieved. I keep visualising the future and feeling impatient that we aren’t there yet, and I need to visualise the past too. Because, hell, we’ve done really well so far.

We’ve processed a life-changing diagnosis, sold a house, bought a house, dealt with the appointments, emails, phone calls and stress involved in those things. I coped with the excruciating anxiety of house viewings that only a perfectionist with crippling anxiety can comprehend. We’ve closed the business and put the building up for sale and dealt with the tirade of communications involved in that; we’ve planned massive house alterations, communicated our needs, tolerated 7 weeks of utter chaos and lack of space, lived without a kitchen, a sofa or a place to eat; we’ve kept up with Richard’s meds and appointments. We’ve put up with incompetence, planning regulations, disappointment and frustration. We have taken on board an enormous amount of heartache and processed some difficult truths too. I’m not going to pretend our lives are in any way perfect right now.

So for now we are busy being not OK. It’s perfectly reasonable that we are not OK. We know how to be okay though and are working on that.

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