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The Power to Rearrange

Recent events have taught me many things. Importantly, though, they have taught me that the future is not just ten years away, one year away, one month away, one week away. The future is our next breath, our next step, what we’re having for dinner. Tomorrow is the future – not just sometime; not just some other time down the line.

We can’t put off what we want to do, what we need to do, and pretend there is still time.

Old age is not a certainty. A healthy old age is most definitely not a certainty for us. We (as a couple) know now that our old age – if we are lucky enough to have one – will come with some big challenges. And we don’t know which ones.

A Parkinson’s diagnosis shouts “Uncertain shit ahead!” in a way we’ve forgotten to look out for. Life is all about uncertain shit ahead for each and every one of us. We have Richard’s dopamine receptors to thank for that nudge. I find myself wanting to tell other people “Don’t wait for your nudge!” “Don’t have regrets!”

Remember how you nearly weren’t born. Remember how it was nearly a different sperm, a different egg. How lucky are you to be here?! Life is full of accidents and butterfly wings and chains of events that we can control some of and we can’t control a lot of.

Our simple existence is a random chance to spin around the sun a few times and catch a few summers that we are so bloody lucky to experience. It’s so very precious and so very short and so very precarious.

I’m a very straightforward thinker (believe it or not!)

I don’t believe in meant to be.

I don’t believe that everything happens for a reason.

I don’t believe in any greater plan, and I really really don’t believe in destiny.

I’ve seen too much senseless pain to believe any of it happened for a reason. I’ve seen too much destructive greed and excruciatingly difficult lives to believe it was meant to be.

I’ve seen paths of equally good people go such different ways I can’t believe it was fate.

I believe that life is a series of events that could have been changed if we knew, that can be changed based on our tools, and that can’t be controlled totally because of our genes and our circumstances.

I even believe our power to make the best of situations is partly ours to control and partly impossible to control simply because of our genetic makeup and past experiences.

You can choose happiness but you can’t make it choose you.

This wasn’t “meant to be”. I wasn’t meant to walk behind my husband watching his muscles waste and his right side seize up and those beautiful muscly surfer’s shoulders I fell in love with shrink. Iwasn’t meant to look forward to spending our whole lives frightened of what’s next and wondering if he’ll ever be able to hold his grandchildren when they come along. I wasn’t meant to spend every day trying not to pity a man who can no longer sign his name or write without a huge struggle. He’s in pain when he wakes and slow to get out of bed before he’s even old. How can that be some kind of plan? I wasn’t meant to lose the freedom usually brought by middle age and big kids who no longer need care 24/7 to a disease that forced us to rapidly and drastically change our lives before we were ready. Just as I don’t think our baby sister was meant to die of neuroblastoma or our father of leukaemia.

I believe in atoms and free radicals and chances and missed chances and metabolic cravings and the effects of greedy men on our lives.

I believe in power. I believe in self-power being easier to harness in some of us over others, and however much some of us want life to be better we can’t make it happen.

Being able to harness what you have is a big separator. Whatever the individual components that made me are useful tools in spotting the good in life, in making choices towards happiness, in seeing and feeling the good around me. My chances are better because the series of events that made me who I am today make me better able to choose happiness.

A house full of books, a childhood learning music, much free time for thinking, a home in a beautiful area, educated parents, some fairly untypical opportunities at a young age to be forced consider others and to realise I was lucky to be alive ????? I don’t know? Some of that? All of that? Other stuff? My biological makeup? My fussy guts? My good bacteria? My bad bacteria?

I know I have the power to be happy. I know I do and I know I’m lucky in that.

I know that’s partly because happiness chose me – and that’s not fate or destiny or meant or be. It happened for reasons. But not a reason. And this is why we can rearrange our lives and make it work and be happy. This doesn’t make us better than anyone else. It makes us lucky.

I’m sad about what’s happening to my husband but we will cope and we will find ways around it because we have the power to. But I don’t for a second think it was meant to be. Another kind of nudge would have been kinder.

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